Radiocarbon dating artifacts

Posted by / 03-Oct-2017 08:11

Radiocarbon dating artifacts

They were found in dense caches: In one spot, 1478 bones, among them 20 skulls, were packed into an area of just 12 square meters. That’s 10% of the find layer, at most, maybe just 3% or 4%,” says Detlef Jantzen, chief archaeologist at MVDHP.

Archaeologists think the bodies landed or were dumped in shallow ponds, where the motion of the water mixed up bones from different individuals. “If we excavated the whole area, we might have 750 people.

About 3200 years ago, two armies clashed at a river crossing near the Baltic Sea.

“Very few talked about warfare.” The 10,000 bones in this room—what’s left of Tollense’s losers—changed all that.

Thousands of warriors came together in a brutal struggle, perhaps fought on a single day, using weapons crafted from wood, flint, and bronze, a metal that was then the height of military technology.

Struggling to find solid footing on the banks of the Tollense River, a narrow ribbon of water that flows through the marshes of northern Germany toward the Baltic Sea, the armies fought hand-to-hand, maiming and killing with war clubs, spears, swords, and knives.

“This is that smoking gun.” The flint arrowhead embedded in this upper arm bone first alerted archaeologists to the ancient violence in the Tollense Valley.

Landesamt Für Kultur Und Denkmalpflege Mecklenburg-Vorpommern/Landesarchäologie/S. Suhr The lakeside hunting lodge called Schloss Wiligrad was built at the turn of the 19th century, deep in a forest 14 kilometers north of Schwerin, the capital of the northern German state of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern.

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There’s little disagreement now that Tollense is something special.

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